FAQs


What do Sailabilty volunteers do?
What is a blue card and why do I need one?
How do I learn to rig an access dinghy?
Why all the fuss about consistent rigging of the dinghies?
Who decides that I can sail an access dinghy well enough to take clients?
How does a volunteer learn to sail an access dinghy?
What kind of power boat licence do I need and how do I get it?
How do I learn to operate one of the safety boats?
How do I get a marine radio licence and of what type?
How do I get a licence to operate the electric crane on the dock next to the pontoon?

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What do Sailability volunteers do?

Not all of our volunteers sail. Among other jobs our volunteers do are:
   –   Registering clients & carers and receiving payments;
   –   Monitoring the distribution of safety vests and slings
   –   Assisting clients in and out of boats
   –   Assisting skippers with the safe and efficient launching and docking of their dinghies
   –   Crewing Sailability 1 & Sailability 2, our powered safety boats

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What is a blue card and why do I need one? 

It is a legal requirement that every SSC volunteer have a blue card.  You can learn all that you need to know about the blue card system, and download an application form, from here.  Our Membership Secretary will submit your application to the appropriate authority once you have filled out the form and provided a copy of appropriate identification.

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How do I learn to rig an access dinghy? 

Reading a copy of the manufacturer’s documentation can be a good start.  Manly Sailability have also produced a video guide.

The SSC Access Dinghy Rigging Check list might also be useful reading.  It includes information about how the SSCQ rigging procedure differs from that shown in the Sailability Manly videos, for example, SSCQ do not use the roller reefing systems in the manner shown in the Manly video.

Finally, please feel free to turn up early at a Sailability session for a hands on lesson; we can always use a hand with this task.

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Why all the fuss about consistent rigging of the dinghies?

It is essential to the comfort and safety of both skippers and clients.  Consistent rigging means fewer surprises on the water for skippers, clients and safety boat operators.

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Who decides that I can sail an access dinghy well enough?

An experienced skipper will assess your level of competence and your commitment to safe sailing practices.

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How does a volunteer learn to sail an access dinghy?

If you lack prior experience then it will help to learn to sail any type of dinghy first.  This document describes a few of the fundamentals of sailing an access dinghy. For practical instruction, you may ask an experienced friend for help or seek a commercial provider of instruction.  If you have already mastered the basics of dinghy sailing then your next step is to read the SSCQ policies and procedures.  At that point, it might help you to turn up early on Tuesday morning and ask if another volunteer can accompany you in some practice runs before clients arrive.

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What kind of power boat licence do I need and how do I get it?

A recreational marine driver licence is sufficient.  Try this link for further information: Maritime Safety Queensland.

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How do I learn to operate one of the safety boats?

Please ask the Officer of the Day if some one is available to provide instruction.  This will be helpful as a second person is needed on each safety boat.  Don’t forget to read the policies and procedures first.

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How do I get a marine radio licence and of what type?

Some of our volunteers require a marine VHF licence.  Try this link: Australian Maritime College how to obtain a Certificate of Proficiency

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How do I get a licence to operate the electric crane on the dock next to the pontoon?

Please speak to a member of the management committee.

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